Published by the Artist 2017

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On view: September 22 - October 5, 2017
Curated by: Angela Conant and Grayson Cox

Published by the Artist, IPCNY’s biennial pop-up exhibition and fundraiser, displays work priced at $400 or less, so that the younger generation of artists and collectors can start acquiring and supporting their peers. Proceeds of all sales are shared equally by the artist and IPCNY to benefit its exhibitions and programming.

Artists Grayson Cox and Angela Conant invited a wide range of artists, from emerging voces to well-known names like Kiki Smith and Dan Walsh, to donate prints for the exhibition. In addition to these donations, participating artists have also been invited to create risograph editions in IPCNY’s new workshop space, as part of a collaboration with The Sunview Luncheonette

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Published by the Artist 2015

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On view: September 10 - 17, 2015
Selected by: Erik Hougen

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Artists: Bill Abdale, Beverly Acha, Golnar Adili, Fanny Allié, BJ Alumbaugh, Silvina Arismendi, ASVP, Felipe Baeza, Bryan Christopher Baker, Amy Barkow, David Barthold, Guy Ben-Ari, Anders Bergstrom, Megan Berk, Edwin Bethea, Josh Bindewald, Sonya Blesofsky, Theresa Bloise, Noah Breuer, Sarah Carpenter, Blake Carrington, Nathan Catlin, Andrew Chan, Deb Chaney, Laura Charlton, Noa Charuvi, Katie Commodore, Matthew Conradt, Mary Cosh, Grayson Cox, Maia Cruz Palileo, Helen Dennis, Kelly Driscoll, Stella Ebner, Julia Elsas, Ivan Forde, Mark Franchino, Robyn Frank, Beka Goedde, Kate Goyette, Rhia Hurt, Justin Israels, Amy Jacobs, Craig Kaths, Jane Kent, Daniel Kingery, Charles Koegel, Alix Lambert, Jon Legere, Dana Lemoine, Ruth Lingen, Erika Lipkes, Jeb Long, Eric LoPresti, Rita MacDonald, Elise Margolis, Esperanza Mayobre, Martin Mazorra, Arturo Meade, Elizabeth Meggs, Donna Moran, Fumi Mini Nakamura, Tomomi Ono, Seamus Liam O’ Brien, Bridget Parris, Anthony Picarelli, David Pierce, Ben Pinder, Lina Puerta, Krystal Quiles, Jay Riggio, Elle Rotstein, Patrick Rowe, Justin Sanz, Sarah Shebaro, Tiffany Smith, Charles Spitzack, Melissa Staiger, Jonathan Stanish, Beth Sutherland, Katsumi Suzuki, Lisa Switalski, Keigo Takahashi, Matt Van Asselt, Daniel Vasquez, John Volk, Jeff Vreeland, Leah Wolff, Christine Wong Yap 

Published by the Artist 2013

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On view: December 12 - 17, 2013
Selected by: Katie Michel and Brad EwingWhether levigating stones or exposing screens, throughout art history the printer’s apprentice dutifully performed such crucial preparatory tasks, often blackening his hands in the process. The lore of these sullied mitts evolved into a convenient allegory, equating the necessary alchemy that these assistants trafficked in to literally “black arts,” and therefore a stand-in for the mischievous hands of a devil – more often than not in an effort to lay blame when misfortune or calamity struck in the studio.

To this day, this de facto “printer’s devil” remains not only a necessary “evil” within the complex process of realizing editions, but like any behind-the-scenes artisan worth his/her salt, an inherently resourceful maker and self-propagator.

Published By The Artist makes reference to that last, lonely line of an artwork’s didactic listing which confesses its affiliation, not with a gallery or collector, but with its creator, while championing the discipline of such “devils” in allocating the time to cleanse blackened hands and produce their own work – often after hours – harnessing the same rigor and commitment lavished upon the realization of prints by more celebrated artists.

Published by the Artist 2012

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On view: January 19 - January 21, 2012
Selected by: Brad Ewing and Katie Michel

Open press release
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Whether levigating stones or exposing screens, throughout art history the printer’s apprentice dutifully performed such crucial preparatory tasks, often blackening his hands in the process. The lore of these sullied mitts evolved into a convenient allegory, equating the necessary alchemy that these assistants trafficked in to literally “black arts,” and therefore a stand-in for the mischievous hands of a devil – more often than not in an effort to lay blame when misfortune or calamity struck in the studio

To this day, this de facto “printer’s devil” remains not only a necessary “evil” within the complex process of realizing editions, but like any behind-the-scenes artisan worth his/her salt, an inherently resourceful maker and self-propagator.

Published By The Artist makes reference to that last, lonely line of an artwork’s didactic listing which confesses its affiliation, not with a gallery or collector, but with its creator, while championing the discipline of such “devils” in allocating the time to cleanse blackened hands and produce their own work – often after hours – harnessing the same rigor and commitment lavished upon the realization of prints by more celebrated artists.